A Sociology of Contemporary Chinese Mobilities: Educating China on the Move

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A Sociological Review Foundation Seminar Series

Funded by The Sociological Review Foundation

Organised by Keele University and University of Bath

Co-hosted by King’s College London

Organisers: Dr Cora Lingling Xu (Keele University) and Professor Catherine Montgomery (University of Bath)

For abstracts of all papers in this seminar series, please click here.

With the quickening pace of economic development in China and the overall shift in political economy globally, China’s approaches towards globalisation, as manifested in its many new forms of mobilities, can have far-reaching social and political impacts on China itself, on Asia and the rest of the world. To date, however, little research has been done to facilitate a systematic sociological understanding of the complex relationships between the Chinese modes of globalisation and their impacts on social change and development of Chinese societies, and the rest of the world.

Taking education as a vehicle, this series of three seminars seeks to answer key questions including:

  • What are the current trends of educational mobilities within and across China?
  • How do group mobilities for education work and what are the impacts on the individuals, the country, and the rest of the world?
  • What does it mean to be educationally (im)mobile in China?
  • How will educational (im)mobilities within and beyond China develop in the future?

Educating China On The Move_Poster 1-1

 Seminar 1: Embodying China’s educational (im)mobilities: Ethnographic insights

Registration is free of charge. Complimentary lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please register here.

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Date: Wednesday 20 September 2017

Venue: CM 0.12, Claus Moser Building, Keele University, ST5 5BG

Time: 12 noon to 5 pm

Confirmed speakers include: Dr Maggi Leung (Universiteit Utrecht), Dr Anni Kajanus (London School of Economics and Harvard University), Dr Peidong Yang (Nanyang Technological University) and Dr Cora Lingling Xu (Keele University)Programme on 20 September 2017_Sociological Review Seminar at Keele-1

 

In this first seminar, our speakers will focus on the nuanced, day-to-day corporal experiences of individuals involved in the processes of China’s educational (im)mobilities. The political and social migration in China will be foregrounded because of the significance of migration to issues of class stratification/urban and rural divide. We will invite speakers to share their empirical insights into the embodied experiences, struggles and benefits of social agents undergoing various forms of educational mobilities or education in situ within the Chinese contexts. Such individuals can include migrants, international students and/or academics from and within China, Chinese and foreign students or scholars on international branch campuses or collaborative programmes in China and/or students and academics who move across different regions of China.

Educating China On The Move_Poster 2-1

Seminar 2: The landscape of Chinese educational (im)mobilities: Perspectives of larger-scale data

Registration is free of charge. Complimentary lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please register here.

To follow our latest updates, please visit our Facebook page here.

Date: 9 November 2017

Venue: River Room, Strand Campus, King’s College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS

Time: 11 am to 4 pm

Confirmed speakers include: Professor Yaojun Li (Manchester University), Professor Futao Huang (Hiroshima University, Japan), Professor Catherine Montgomery (University of Bath), Dr Cora Lingling Xu (Keele University), Dr Miaoyan Yang (Xiamen University, China)

 

In this seminar, papers will employ larger-scale data to recognise and outline the broad trends of education (im)mobilities within and beyond China. We will focus on interrogating how, if at all, social inequalities are reduced or reproduced through various forms of education (im)mobilities. We will question whether by focusing on (im)mobilities, we are valorising certain forms of educational trajectories over other less prominent forms. Methodologically, we will address the difficulties with getting hold of high quality large-scale data with Chinese contexts. By the end of this seminar we will have a more critical understanding regarding the merits and pitfalls of the grand narratives of educational (im)mobilities within the Chinese contexts.

Educating China On The Move_Poster 3-1

Seminar 3: Educating China on the move: China’s relations with key strategic powers

Registration is free of charge. Complimentary lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please register here.

To follow our latest updates, please visit our Facebook page here.

Date: Friday 1 December 2017

Venue: University of Bath

Time: 12 noon to 5 pm

Confirmed speakers include: Professor Ka Ho Mok (Lingnan University, Hong Kong), Dr Johanna L. Waters (Oxford University), Dr Dian Liu (University of Stavanger, Norway), Lulu Sun (IOE, UCL)

In this seminar, we will focus on China’s role as an education provider for mobile students and scholars in Asia and Africa. Our papers will investigate the impacts of educational (im)mobilities between China and such key strategic powers in Asia and Africa. There are compelling reasons to believe that the emerging political and economic ties between China and these above-mentioned powers have significant influences on individuals’ decisions over education (im)mobilities. By the end of this seminar we will have a greater understanding of the intricate relations between individual educational mobilities trajectories and inter-state dynamics in the regions and this will provide a significant insight for countries in the Global North.

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